baumzaehlen - Primeval Forests & Their Trees

©2017copyright christoph hase

Lower Coles Road, Tasmania, Australia

 

The tallest known Opens internal link in current windowEucalyptus delegatensis (alpine ash) individual is located in this stand; it is 87.9 metres tall1. The stand is at the eastern edge of Opens internal link in current windowFranklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park but not a part of it. However, the stand was added to the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site in 2013. E. delegatensis forms an upper canopy, under which there is developing ”rainforest” composed of Opens internal link in current windowNothofagus cunninghamii (myrtle beech) and Opens internal link in current windowAtherosperma moschatum (southern sassafras). Thus, the stand is a Tasmanian “mixed forest” (see, Opens internal link in current windowFranklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park).

 

There are no trails. Walking is very difficult due to fallen giant E. delegatensis and dense undergrowth.

 

References:

 

1        http://gianttrees.com.au/


Eucalyptus delegatensis (alpine ash), left and background; Nothofagus cunninghamii (myrtle beech), right; Atherosperma moschatum (southern sassafras) foliage, left; Dicksonia antarctica (soft tree fern) leaves, bottom.
Lower Coles Road Eucalyptus delegatensis (alpine ash) stand foreground centre and right, while background mountains lie within Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park.